Nutrition for Ageing with Vitality.

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Today we have a guest with us, who is an expert in Nutrition and all things to do with health at any age.

Her name is Jane Hutton. You will find her info in the article. 

Thank you Jane for this very useful and down to earth advice. There is so much information about what is healthy and what is not, that it is good to have something to base our decisions on when we come to making healthy choices. Even more so as we get older.

 So; Over to Jane. 

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“It comes to us all in the end.” Hearing those immortal words has become something of a cliche when we feel a twinge, forget why we went upstairs, or notice a new wrinkle when we look in the mirror. It can be easy to fall into a kind of resignation, viewing a gradual crumbling as inevitable once we cross that mythical line into the twilight zone of middle age. The good news? It’s not. There’s much you can do to protect your body and mind from the ravages of time.

 

Not surprisingly, the most potent weapons in staying fit and healthy well into our later years involve treating ourselves holistically. By that I mean that it’s no good cutting the fat off your pork chop if you’re going to sit in a chair all day. It’s pointless going for a daily constitutional stroll if your diet revolves around microwave meals because you never learned to cook.

 

We are what we eat, to be sure, but what about those common traits of getting older, like smaller appetite or less efficient digestion? Are they linked to increasing ill health? They certainly can be; in purely nutritional terms, your body uses the nutrients from your food to fuel the billions of processes and functions going on every day, so if you aren’t getting all the nutrients you need, cracks will eventually begin to show. Without the deficiencies being addressed, niggles become issues, irritations become illness.

 

Lack of nutrients can cause a lack of appetite, and mean that less digestive enzymes are produced to digest what food is eaten. These two aspects combined can result in a vicious circle where not enough is eaten to provide essential nutrients, the nutrients consumed aren’t all available to be used by the body, and the consequent deficiencies mean that appetite suffers. Indigestion or other gastric symptoms can also be an indication that you’re not getting enough of what you need.

 

Naturally, there is an element of wear and tear as we age, but if we prevent age-related decline by being aware of potential potholes, and put pre-emptive strategies in place, the effects will be minimised, and prevention is always better than cure.

 

So, how do you ensure that you are getting everything your body and brain need for firing on all cylinders? Try to implement these easy tips:

 

  1. Eat fresh, unprocessed food – packaged, refined meals are stripped of nutrients. Remember, it’s not about calories, it’s about nutrients.

 

  1. Buy your food from a local source if possible – if you don’t have a greengrocer and butcher within easy distance, there are many box schemes and local produce hubs. For instance, in Plymouth you could choose from Riverford, Joe Brown’s, The Cornish Food Box Company, and Tamar Valley Food Hubs, plus several more.

 

  1. If you don’t know how to cook, make it a priority to learn. Look on it as an adventure, a creative outlet, and a way to maintain independence. Enrol in a class with a friend, or find a good recipe source and cook up a storm with a friend as a social occasion – cooking with and for others is fun as well as healthy.

 

  1. Eat regular meals, whether you’re hungry or not. If your food is fresh and nutrient-dense, having more smaller meals is just as good as having three larger meals every day.

 

  1. Optimise the digestion and uptake of nutrients – a plant-based digestive enzyme is a good way to do this, or you can take a teaspoon of organic apple cider vinegar in a little water just before meals to stimulate digestion. If you have had antibiotics, it’s also crucial to restore your gut flora with a good probiotic that contains several strains – in some countries, it’s common practice to prescribe probiotics along with antibiotics; not so here. The fact remains that our micro biome is essential to health.

 

  1. Exercise daily – this is as important for appetite as your mineral balance. While zinc deficiency can cause reduced appetite and compromised sense of taste, not doing enough can impact on how hungry you feel. Regular exercise naturally has the added benefit of boosting metabolism and keeping muscles healthy.

 

There you have it: just a few quick tips that you can put into practice today to improve your health, prevent illness, and hold back the years. Just a few small tweaks can make a huge difference!

 

 

For more information on personal plans, targeted health advice, or any other ways I can help, you can find me at jane@trinityholistics.co.uk, or on 07841 344934.

 

You can try my recipe hub at www.functional-foodie.com – the free membership allows access to some easy, delicious recipes, while full membership gives access to a growing collection; great for quick inspiration.

 

www.trinityholistics.co.uk

 

www.functional-foodie.com

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